Posts for "Criminal Law" filter

Post date: Posted on: June 20, 2016

On the Foundation for Economic Education website, Professor Alex Tabarrok explains that a potential problem with “Ban the Box” laws is that such laws actually significantl

Tags: Administrative Law, Criminal Law, Labor and Employment, Legal Theory
Post date: Posted on: April 23, 2016

In a short video on the Federalist Society website, Professor Gregory McNeal—an expert on drones and topics related to security, technology, and crime—discusses drones and property rights, and a

Tags: Criminal Law, Legal Theory, Real Estate / Real Property, Technology & Law
Post date: Posted on: April 13, 2016

At the Washington Post, Clay Conrad writes on the history of jury nullification in a piece entitled "History is clear: Juries were supp

Tags: Civil Litigation / Civil Procedure, Comparative Law, Courts, Criminal Law
Post date: Posted on: March 21, 2016

Lawyers must be wary of any communication with jurors in cases the lawyers are litigating.  It is universally recognized that such contact is forbidden as it could sway or influence a juror’s decision-making, even unconsciously.  But how attenuated can such contact be and still be considered to f

Tags: Administrative Law, Civil Litigation / Civil Procedure, Commercial Litigation, Courts, Criminal Law, Legal Ethics, Legal Industry, Legal Theory
Post date: Posted on: March 18, 2016

In a cross-post on the Volokh Conspiracy and Foundation for Economic Education websites, Eugene Volokh briefly analyzes a jury nullification bill that was passed by th

Tags: Constitutional Law, Courts, Criminal Law, Evidence, Legal Theory
Post date: Posted on: July 2, 2015

In Georgetwon Law Review, Judge Alex Kozinski analyzes some of the common tropes in discussions about criminal law in the U.S., and offers solutions to some of the most prevalent shortcomings of the c

Tags: Constitutional Law, Criminal Law
Post date: Posted on: May 9, 2015

We’ve all seen automobile bumper stickers such as, “Keep honking, I’m reloading,” and yard signs such as, “Trespassers will be shot, survivors will be shot again.” These clever and funny messages grab our attention. But is it wise to display them?

Tags: Criminal Law, Evidence, Torts
Post date: Posted on: March 28, 2015

New Hampshire recently closed a gap in its laws by amending the criminal code to make financial exploitation of an elderly, disabled, or impaired adult a criminal offense. The amendments became effective at the beginning of this year.

Tags: Criminal Law, Fiduciary Duties, Trust Law, Wills & Estates

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